GROWING ECONOMIES THROUGH PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: EXPLORING THE BENEFITS AND RISKS OF PPPS FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN EMERGING ECONOMIES

Sophie attended the 2017 OECD Forum and is a UNSW Co-op Scholar. She is currently completing her final year of a Bachelor of Commerce. She has a passion for change making and has held several internship roles at Coca-Cola Amatil, TAL, and Westpac.

ABSTRACT

The increasing population growth and urbanisation of emerging economies is driving an increase in demand for infrastructure investment across the globe. Historically, Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) have been used to connect public infrastructure projects with private investors, promising innovative solutions and improved resource allocation for emerging economies (OECD, 2012). However, recent PPPs have demonstrated that without clear goals, outcomes and strategic plans, these infrastructure projects can be exposed to a tremendous amount of risk for both parties, both in monetary and social terms.

 

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A consideration of 'Asset Recycling' as a means of improving infrastructure levels

By Tony Chen

Tony attended the 2016 World Bank and IMF Annual Meetings in Washington D.C. Tony is studying a Bachelor of Commerce at the University of Melbourne Faculty of Business and Economics.

Abstract

This policy paper explores the topic of Asset Recycling. Asset Recycling (which will be referred to via the abbreviation AR from here forth) is a process of funding and creating new infrastructure developments through the privatisation of current nationally held physical assets and utilities.

There are three broad parts to this paper. The first considers the economic costs and benefits surrounding privatisation and brings them together in a decision rule. The second section examines how the government can optimise the balance between these costs and benefits in order to attain the most favourable outcome for society. Finally, the paper analyses how privatisation and Asset Recycling should be considered in the context of global and domestic economic stability. This will be accomplished through a case study of the Brazilian electricity industry during the 1990s under the government of Fernando Cardoso.

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Quarterly Access Journal: Nicholas Taylor Contributor

Nicholas attended the 2013 World Bank and IMF Annual Meetings in Washington DC where he represented the University of Melbourne FBE. As part of the Global Voices Scholarship, Nicholas researched how to bridge the global infrastructure gap. His research was published in the Australian Institute of International Affairs journal Quarterly Access. You can read his research here or copy the following URL into your browser http://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/bridging-the-global-infrastructure-gap/