Fostering inclusive growth through the Job Guarantee

Sean attended the 2018 OECD Forum in Paris. He is currently studying Undergraduate Studies in International Studies and Japanese at Curtin University.

Abstract

A key issue raised at the 2018 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, 2018) forum was the need for nations to design solutions for inclusive growth “through studies and data surrounding better education, employment, healthcare and housing, making sure that growth is truly inclusive” (OECD, 2018). The inclusive growth program at the OECD has analysed the myriad sources for global inequality and has determined that, while acknowledging there is much room for future research, solutions lay with national governments (OECD, 2017, p. 5). The ‘Bridging the Gap’ publication argues for a re-orientation of welfare toward lifelong platforms that ensure a variety of outcomes for citizens, including job support, health, wellbeing, and foundations for future learning (OECD, 2017, p. 5).

A national Job Guarantee program is a comprehensive and universal replacement for welfare that is funded and directed by national governments. The foundation of a Job Guarantee program is guaranteed work for a guaranteed annual income set by the government. The Job Guarantee is a radical and necessary re-orientation of welfare addressing key issues outlined by the OECD. Only the government is in the position to address this and, as such, this policy paper seeks to explore the Job Guarantee program as a key policy recommendation to achieve inclusive growth.

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The Entrepreneurship Solution: Meeting the Global Youth Unemployment Crisis

The Entrepreneurship Solution: Meeting the Global Youth Unemployment Crisis

By Erin Watson-Lynn

Erin was a Global Voices Y20 Delegate for 2015

Abstract

Globally, some 75 million young people are unemployed. The International Labour Organisation warns that this is an unprecedented crisis. High levels of unemployment mean that young people across the developed and developing worlds face increased precariousness, poverty and uncertainty. The result of this is the threat of intergenerational inequality not seen since the Great Depression. Given the stubborn persistence of youth unemployment, more policy attention is clearly needed. The Group of Twenty (G20) leaders have made some commitments to address this crisis. One of these is to promote enabling environments for entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship is an attractive policy proposition with some best practice examples. However, the macroeconomic impact of these policies is difficult to measure, and there is an absence of empirical evidence that has attempted to do so. This paper establishes youth unemployment as a crisis, describes how entrepreneurship can act as a possible solution, and provides two examples of frameworks for understanding the policy across varying environments. Finally, the paper offers three policy recommendations. 

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International job creation in 2012

Oliver attended the G20 summit in Mexico where he represented the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Oliver is currently studying a Bachelor of Arts (International Studies).

Abstract 

The G20 has emerged as an important problem solver following the global meltdown in 2008 and job creation is expected to be a major discussion point at this year’s Summit to be held in Mexico. Australia has already voiced strong support behind job creation despite the country’s relatively stable rate of unemployment. The following paper investigates the rationale behind the Australian Government’s decision to prioritise job creation. The research reveals that major problems still exist in the Australian labour market and as an export orientated economy Australia must support initiatives to promote global economic stability, such as job creation. Supporting jobs at this year’s G20 Summit is also an important political tool for Australia to promote G20 consensus and to advance the reputation of the organisation. Despite Australia’s strong support behind job creation, it is not clear what measures the Government will lobby behind to stimulate employment growth. The Australian Government seems unlikely to support fiscal stimulus, green jobs or the introduction of a financial transaction tax as a direct solution to the jobs crisis. Australia is expected to back initiatives to reduce youth unemployment. These initiatives include skills training and increased social protection for young people and which reflects the recent policy focus of the Gillard Government.

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